Sunday, 24 May 2015

7 Years Bad Sex - Nicky Wells

About the book...
One wedding. One curse?  Disaster ever after…

A seven-years-bad-sex curse? Surely not! Yet something went wrong when rock singer Casey and drummer Alex got married on that beautiful yacht anchored off St Tropez in the south of France. Something went badly wrong. For even on their wedding night, the young couple discovers a complete and somewhat surprising inability to make love. Muddling through their honeymoon with a string of thin excuses for their predicament, the lovers defer finding a solution (and panicking) until the return to their home in London. After all, they married for life and to make rock music, not for the love of sex. Right?

But when they resume life as normal in London, all hell breaks loose. Increasingly frantic in their quest for release, the unhappy newlyweds embark on a string of hilarious and occasionally harmful antics that drives them, their band, and an assortment of random strangers to the brink of despair. But it ain’t over ‘til it’s over or, in this case… it ain’t over ‘til the newlyweds sing.

About the author...
Romance that Rocks Your World!

Ultimate rock chick author Nicky Wells writes romance with rock stars—because there’s no better romantic hero than a golden-voiced bad boy with a secret soft heart and a magical stage presence!

Nicky’s books offer glitzy, glamorous romance with rock stars—imagine Bridget Jones ROCKS Notting Hill! If you’ve ever had a crush on any kind of celebrity, you’ll connect with Nicky’s heroes and their leading ladies.

Born in Germany, Nicky moved to the United Kingdom in 1993 and currently lives in Lincoln with her husband and their two boys. Nicky loves listening to rock music, dancing, and eating lobsters. When she’s not writing, she’s a wife, mother, occasional knitter, and ad-hoc radio show presenter. Rock on!


Did you know? There’s a single out now by Nicky’s fictional rock band Tuscq come to life! “Love Me Better” is available for download from AmazoniTunes and many other places. 

My thoughts...
I was given an ecopy of 7 Years Bad Sex by Nicky Wells the author in exchange for an honest review which I'm more than happy to give.

This is another 'rocktastic' book written by the lovely Nicky Wells.  Once again Nicky has presented characters that are both plausible and realistic.  With scenario's that are both hilarious and sensitive but believable.  The main couple Alex and Casey work and play together as part of a band and couple.  They are considered by their friends to be a match made in heaven.  They really do personify 'being in love'.  The story begins with their wedding, a romantic day, surrounded by their friends on board a beautiful yacht - everything is perfect, they raise a toast and both experience a weird sensation that nobody else appears to have noticed, so much so that they begin to think they imagined it.  It does come back to haunt them later on, inadvertently they seem to have been dragged into a curse!

Alex and Casey exude happiness, they couldn't wait for their guests to leave so they could begin their honeymoon 'proper'.  Only things don't seem to happen as they should, they were totally unpeturbed though as perhaps they were too drunk or too tired was their thinking.  As the days count down and still no action they both start to come up with innovative ways to kick start some bedroom action.  As weeks turn into months and nothing seems to be helping their perfect relationship starts to crumble.

Nicky has cleverly woven a story around a story.  What was at first impression a light, humorous read becomes quite deep.  Touching on the raw emotions felt by both Alex and Casey was at times quite upsetting - the perfect couple can't function on everyday life because of their problems, it's all consuming and neither can see a way forward without a physical relationship.  Nicky had developed the characters so well I really cared what happened to them, almost like real friends and desperately wanted them to find a way forward.  I definitely didn't want their fledgling marriage to end.  As a voyeur looking into their relationship I wanted to give them advice, tell them to back off and give each other space and find another focus - love and relationships should be natural and instinctive not forced and planned like a military operation.  The harder they tried the worse things got.

All in all, this book really was a tonic, there were so many laugh out loud and hand over mouth 'oh my god' moments that the pages literally turned themselves.  The deep love shared by Casey and Alex shone through time and time again even when things were at their worst.   A marriage based on friendship first giving them deep foundations to tackle what eventually became a huge problem.

I highly recommend this book even though like me you'll probably feel guilty laughing at their antics at what to them was a real and serious problem.

Saturday, 23 May 2015

Bride Without a Groom - Amy Lynch

I'm so pleased to be part of the Blog Tour for
Bride Without a Groom by Amy Lynch

About the book...
Bride Without a Groom is witty and packed with brilliant observations of Rebecca Costello’s desperate attempts to get her boyfriend Barry to propose to her. Rebecca is the ultimate Bridezilla – but with a twist - as the only wedding she’s planning is the one in her imagination! So when an exhausted Barry ups and leaves for a business trip to Bangkok where he creates a few misdemeanours of his own, Rebecca is left heartbroken and alone. She’ll do anything to get her man back – but has she gone too far this time? And will Rebecca want Barry back when she finds out what he’s been up to?



About the author...
Amy Lynch is an author of women’s commercial fiction and writing is her passion. She loves to write humorous romantic fiction, but not always with fairy tale endings! She has published fiction in magazines, and has worked in the charity sector for twelve years. She is married with two young children. When she is not writing, Amy can be found juggling school lunches and two Shetland pony-sized rescue dogs. Now, how’s that for multi-tasking? Amy is the author of two novels, Bride Without A Groom and Does My Bump Look Big In This? Her third novel is in progress. 

Guest Post...
                    The letter from the Tooth Fairy          
The tooth fairy made her very first visit to the Lynch house last night. Let’s just say that on an excitement scale of one to ten, it was an eleven. You see, during a posh Sunday lunch at the golf club with the in-laws, out popped my six year old daughter’s tiny bottom tooth. Next thing you know, I’m scrambling under the table to find it, as my daughter squeals in delight. The tooth had been wiggling about all week, threatening to escape, and the little keepsake box from her teacher was at the ready.

Now, paper money, the child informed the amused grown-ups at the table, is better than coin money. And sometimes, she educated us, the fairy left little letters to the children. Some of the girls in her class had lost teeth, you see, so she was quite up to date on the old tooth fairy etiquette. Our younger child was less interested in tooth fairies. He was busy cramming the remaining profiteroles in his chocolate-smeared gob while his sister created a charming distraction. You have to admire the little guy, he didn’t waste an opportunity.
‘Ah yes,’ my mother-in-law winked, ‘the children must be in bed early tonight. They must be asleep when she comes.’ 

Afraid to miss out on the cold hard cash, the kids were out like a light. This was handy, because my husband and I got to watch back to back uninterrupted episodes of ‘Game of Thrones.’ Before going to bed, my husband put a large two Euro coin into the little white box, along with the teeniest letter you’ve ever seen. The mastermind behind the letter, of course, was me. It was a complex, long-winded note, explaining that the tooth fairy (Frenchy) was going to use the tooth to make a necklace for her sister (Pinky) whose birthday it was, and that there was to be a great ball held in Fairyland, and all of the fairies would be dancing in the moonlight. And yes, before you ask, I’d had a large glass of wine before writing it.

At exactly six forty five on a Bank Holiday Monday morning (blast that flipping tooth fairy, this was even earlier than Christmas morning) the children leapt from their beds, exclaiming the good news. The tooth fairy, as promised, had come up with the goods. 
What delighted us the most was not that our daughter insisted that she was going to treat the entire extended family (including long lost cousins) to ice-creams with her mega two Euro coin, but that she was able to read the teeny letter aloud, all by herself. In fact, she read it to everyone we met today. 

The love of reading comes from me. When I was little, dad and I used to adore flicking lazily through The Beano. Later, we progressed to Roald Dahl, our library cards frayed at the edges from frequent Saturday visits. When I close my eyes, the illustrations by Quentin Blake are still visible in my mind. These days, I’m reading ‘The Magic Finger’ to the children, who share my love of Roald Dahl, and have a library card each.  

At eight o’clock every night, my daughter begs for more time before lights out, so that she can finish reading. She permanently has a pen in her hand, doodling and writing constantly. At night, I creep into their bedroom, avoid the creaky floorboard, and remove the pen from her little hand.  She says that when she grows up, she wants to write books, just like her mummy. Perhaps the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. When I look at my daughter, I see the same love of reading and writing, the same hard-working, chatty personality, the same freckled nose. The bookworm gene, I now see, passes from one generation to the next. And just think of all the wonderful stories just waiting to be enjoyed! 

My thoughts...
I'll be posting a review here over the bank holiday weekend - please come back:)

Friday, 22 May 2015

The Island Escape - Kerry Fisher

I'm so pleased to be part of the Blog Tour for 
The Island Escape by Kerry Fisher

About the book...

Can one woman’s marriage survive her best friend’s divorce? Fans of Veronica Henry and Erica James, this is the next book to add to your reading list.

It’s time to get back to where it all began…

Octavia Sheldon thought she’d have a different life. One where she travelled the world with an exotic husband and free-spirited children in tow. But things didn’t turn out quite like that.

Married to safe, reliable Jonathan, her life now consists of packed lunches, school runs and more loads of dirty washing than she ever thought possible. She’s not unhappy. It’s just that she can barely recognise herself any longer.

So as Octavia watches her best friend’s marriage break up, it starts her thinking. What if life could be different? What if she could escape and get back to the person she used to be? Escape back to the island where she spent her summers? And what if the man she used to love was there waiting for her…?

About the author...
I write funny, honest books about ordinary women and family life. When I’m not doing that, I can be seen haring across the Surrey hills trying to stop my lab/schnauzer eating other people’s picnics or running off with their kites. Or helping my teenage son think back to when he might last have seen his rugby shorts. Or explaining to my daughter that I can help with English, Latin and Spanish but art, technology or, ugh, sewing, she’s on her own. Or telling my very tolerant husband that the dog needs organic chicken because she’s got a sensitive stomach but could he make do with an omelette?

But I wasn’t always a writer. Once I left my hometown of Peterborough to go to university in Bath, I got the travel bug and have never recovered. I was an English teacher in Spain and Corsica, a holiday rep in Tuscany, a PA in an art school in Florence, a guidebook researcher and author, travel journalist. Horizons, broad, exciting, unknown and promising were what inspired me. Nothing thrilled or terrified me quite as much as landing in a foreign country with a whole new territory to discover.
And then the children arrived…and with them disappeared the days of elephant riding in Thailand, testing new theme park rides in America and abseiling down the highest tower in Rotterdam.  So I had to find new ways of exploring far-flung lands. After working as a book reviewer for Candis magazine, I realised fiction was the way to keep that sense of anticipation and excitement alive.
When the children were young, the challenge was finding the time to write. Now both are at senior school, the challenge is to write down the funny (and sometimes hideous) things they say before I forget in case I need to use them in a novel – in our house, there’s no such thing as a free lunch. Even the dog has to make friends on the hill so that I can talk to their owners about books. So if you see otherwise sane-looking women leaping into hedges and hiding behind oak trees on the Surrey Downs, they’ve probably spotted me heading their way with my latest book recommendation…
Other than reading and writing, I love cooking, entertaining, wine and friends…I’m more like Clover than Jen1 – not very groomed and a bit messy, though I don’t have wellies in my kitchen sink. Or a trust fund…
My thoughts...
I was given a copy of this book by Kerry's publishers in exchange for an honest review which I'm more than happy to give.  First up, who wouldn't be drawn to pick this book up with a cover like that, especially when we are under a deluge at the moment?!  The idea of warm, sunny days with a sea view sounds like heaven to me.

The book revolves around two friends Octavia and Roberta and their husbands Jonathan and Scott.  Each couple very different, Octavia and Jonathan on the surface, settled into a simple, homely, quiet routine of family life and work.  Roberta and Scott, in comparison  posh, go getters living life at a faster pace with different outlooks to what they want from life.  Each relationship has it's problems and when Roberta ends her marriage Octavia begins to look at her own relationship. Is it what it seems?

I loved this book, a perfect holiday read for a sunny afternoon curled up by the pool with the sun glinting off the water.  This was for me an easy read but was also a very thought provoking book - it's not all pink and fluffy and touches on some serious subjects but Kerry has a light writing style that more than hints at humour and has created characters that are true to life dealing with real life issues.   Predictable at times but written in such a way that it was pacey.  The pages flew by I was so engaged.

I guarantee this book will evoke many questions.  How many of us have ever wondered 'what if'?  This is exactly what Octavia does when the breakdown of Roberta's marriage causes her to take stock of her own life.  Is the grass really greener on the other side?  It can appear so, if like Octavia  you've been in a long term relationship, family commitments and work can take over, leaving no time for fun.

This was in many ways a book full of cliches and highlighted the fact that relationships both romantic and platonic should be equal.  Giving and taking in equal measures.  Anything less than this can be unhealthy and  you should only take out what you put into a relationship. If the balance is unfair, one party will eventually get fed up.  Nothing is ever simple though, relationships are complex and sometimes you have to distance yourself from a relationship to get a clearer picture of what you have and what you want and need for the future.

I loved The Island Escape and have found another author to watch out for.  A book about relationships that are more complex than would first appear has got to be good, satisfying my natural curiosity or 'nosiness' depending which way you look at it. So a huge thank you Kerry, I can't wait for your next one :)


Thursday, 14 May 2015

The Wild One - Janet Glover

It gives me great pleasure to welcome one of publisher Choc Lit's authors to my blog, in what will be a bi-monthly feature. This month it's the turn of Janet Glover who talks about 'the importance of continuity' when approaching writing a series of books. First let me introduce her current book (Book 2 in the Coorah Creek series) and then Janet herself.

About the book...
Can four wounded souls find love? 


Iraq war veteran Dan Mitchell once disobeyed an order – and it nearly destroyed him. Now a national park ranger in the Australian outback, he’s faced with another order he is unwilling to obey ...

Photographer Rachel Quinn seeks out beauty in unlikely places. Her work comforted Dan in his darkest days. But Quinn knows darkness too – and Dan soon realises she needs his help as much as he needs hers.

Carrie Bryant was a talented jockey until a racing accident broke her nerve. Now Dan and Quinn need her expertise, but can she face her fear? And could horse breeder, Justin Fraser, a man fighting to save his own heritage, be the person to help put that fear to rest?

The wounds you can’t see are the hardest to heal ...


About the author...

Janet lives in Surrey with her English husband but grew up in the Australian outback surrounded by books. She solved mysteries with Sherlock Holmes, explored jungles with Edgar Rice Burroughs and shot to the stars with Isaac Asimov and Ray Bradbury. After studying journalism at Queensland University she became a television journalist, first in Australia, then in Asia and Europe. During her career Janet saw and did a lot of unusual things. She met one Pope, at least three Prime Ministers, a few movie stars and a dolphin. Janet now works in television production and travels extensively with her job.

Janet’s first short story, The Last Dragon, was published in 2002. Since then she has published numerous short stories, one of which won the Elizabeth Goudge Award from the Romantic Novelists’ Association. She has previously published three novels with Little Black Dress, Flight to Coorah Creek was Janet’s debut with Choc Lit.

Author Links:-

Guest post...

Not long ago, I sat looking at a blank computer screen thinking – Oh dear, what have I done?

What I’ve done of course is write a series: specifically the Coorah Creek series. In my own defence  it seemed like such a good idea at the time.

The idea was that all the novels would share a setting: the small outback Australian town of Coorah Creek. They also share characters. Each book can be read as a stand-alone story, with its own hero and heroine, but a lot of the same people appear in each book. The hero and heroine of Book 1 appear in Book 2… and so forth. Thus we get to see what happens after I type The End in their story.

Some of the characters in the town also appear in every book:  Trish, the gossip with a heart of gold at the pub and Ed at the garage. They might not be the central characters, but they give that feeling of community.

And the town itself also becomes a character. Its history is important. So too is its future.

I knew there would be some catches to writing a series – continuity is important. The first thing I did was to start drawing a map of the town. Every building that appears in the book gets marked on that map. Every person gets their home marked on the map. In fact, this piece of white cardboard with pencil marks all over it has become a feature of the décor in my office.  The Grand Designs Team probably would not approve.

The second thing I did was to start a spreadsheet for details about characters. Their names, ages and descriptions and so forth, because it’s very easy to forget what colour eyes a secondary character has. Or how long their hair is. I’m now discovering I also have to make a note about what events they participate in. Who was at the Christmas party in Book 3? Who was at the planning meeting in Book 2?

I have discovered that writing a series is hard…  BUT …

I have also discovered that writing a series is the greatest fun.

When I wrote The Wild One, I got to go back to Coorah Creek and spend some time with people I had already met and come to like. And I got to know more about Dan Mitchell, the park ranger we met briefly in Flight To Coorah Creek. And then there was Carrie Bryant, the injured jockey in the first book. It was so good to find out the next step in her story. Not to mentioning gossiping with Trish at the pub again.

Book 3 is written. In it we get to share Christmas with our friends in Coorah Creek (more news on that to come later this year)

I’m in the middle of book 4 now and really enjoying spending more time with my other friends. Someone asked me the other day how many Coorah Creek books I am planning to write. I really don’t know. You see, Chris at the mine wants me to tell his story. So too does young unwed mother Nikki. And then there’s the mayor… I’d love to know why he is so very sad.

Coorah Creek is like a real town to me. There are so many people, good and bad, with stories to tell. I hope you’ll come back with me from time to time.

Wednesday, 13 May 2015

I Let You Go - Clare Mackintosh

About the book...
A tragic accident. It all happened so quickly. She couldn't have prevented it. Could she?

In a split second, Jenna Gray's world descends into a nightmare. Her only hope of moving on is to walk away from everything she knows to start afresh. Desperate to escape, Jenna moves to a remote cottage on the Welsh coast, but she is haunted by her fears, her grief and her memories of a cruel November night that changed her life forever.


Slowly, Jenna begins to glimpse the potential for happiness in her future. But her past is about to catch up with her, and the consequences will be devastating...



Extract...
When I wake, for a second I’m not sure what this feeling is. Everything is the same, and yet everything has changed. Then, before I have even opened my eyes, there is a rush of noise in my head, like an underground train. And there it is: playing out in Technicolor scenes I can’t pause or mute. I press the heels of my palms into my temples as though I can make the images subside through brute force alone, but still they come, thick and fast, as if without them I might forget. On my bedside cabinet is the brass alarm clock Eve gave me when I went to university – ‘Because you’ll never get to lectures, otherwise’ – and I’m shocked to see it’s ten-thirty already. The pain in my hand has been overshadowed by a headache that blinds me if I move my head too fast, and as I peel myself from the bed every muscle aches. I pull on yesterday’s clothes and go into the garden without stopping to make a coffee, even though my mouth is so dry it’s an effort to swallow. I can’t find my shoes, and the frost stings my feet as I make my way across the grass. The garden isn’t large, but winter is on its way, and by the time I reach the other side I can’t feel my toes. The garden studio has been my sanctuary for the last five years. Little more than a shed to the casual observer, it is where I come to think, to work, and to escape. The wooden floor is stained from the lumps of clay that drop from my wheel, firmly placed in the centre of the room, where I can move around it and stand back to view my work with a critical eye. Three sides of the shed are lined with shelves on which I place my sculptures, in an ordered chaos only I could understand. Works in progress, here; fired but not painted, here; waiting to go to customers, here. Hundreds of separate pieces, yet if I shut my eyes, I can still feel the shape of each one beneath my fingers, the wetness of the clay on my palms. I take the key from its hiding place under the window ledge and open the door. It’s worse than I thought. The floor lies unseen beneath a carpet of broken clay; rounded halves of pots ending abruptly in angry jagged peaks. The wooden shelves are all empty, my desk swept clear of work, and the tiny figurines on the window ledge are unrecognisable, crushed into shards that glisten in the sunlight. By the door lies a small statuette of a woman. I made her last year, as part of a series of figures I produced for a shop in Clifton. I had wanted to produce something real, something as far from perfection as it was possible to get, and yet for it still to be beautiful. I made ten women, each with their own distinctive curves, their own bumps and scars and imperfections. I based them on my mother; my sister; girls I taught at pottery class; women I saw walking in the park. This one is me. Loosely, and not so anyone would recognise, but nevertheless me. Chest a little too flat; hips a little too narrow; feet a little too big. A tangle of hair twisted into a knot at the base of the neck. I bend down and pick her up. I had thought her intact, but as I touch her the clay moves beneath my hands, and I’m left with two broken pieces. I look at them, then I hurl them with all my strength towards the wall, where they shatter into tiny pieces that shower down on to my desk. I take a deep breath and let it slowly out.

Link to my review...
http://crooksonbooks.blogspot.co.uk/search/label/Clare%20Mackintosh

About the author...
Clare Mackintosh is an author, feature writer and columnist. She has written for The Guardian, Sainsbury's Magazine, The Green Parent, and many other national publications, and is a columnist for Cotswold Life and Writing Magazine.


Clare spent twelve years in the police force, working on CID, in custody and as a public order commander, and has drawn on her experiences for her début psychological thriller I Let You Go. She is currently writing her second novel, out next year.

Guest post...
The benefits of writing groups
It is often acknowledged that writing is a solitary pursuit, and for the most part that is what I find most appealing about my job. I am happy in my own company, don't crave conversation, and find enough gossip and controversy on Twitter to satisfy any longing for an office environment. I like working variously in pyjamas and high heels (seldom together), and find the dog sufficiently sociable as an office companion. There is, however, no doubt that being on one's own for too long is A Bad Thing, and when I start muttering to myself and stop brushing my hair, I know it's time to get out and see some real life people, not just the ones in my head and my phone. 
Once a month or so I meet up with a couple of author-friends with whom I have formed an unofficial writing group. The advantage of spending half a day at this group is that I can tell myself I've been working (after all, I am a WRITER, so going to a WRITING GROUP is entirely justifiable) even if all I've done is eaten biscuits and bemoaned my lack of inspiration. It's the second time I've been involved in some kind of writing group, and whereas the first attempt didn't work for me at all, my current group works brilliantly. In fact, I'd be lost without them. 
With such different experiences, I wondered what it was that made a writing group work - or not - and concluded that it is a hugely personal affair. If you're considering finding, or forming, a group, consider what it is that you want to get out of it. My first group had relatively small sessions - perhaps 6-8 attendees - with everyone reading a small piece of writing for feedback. The usual caveats were given: this was a safe, supportive environment, where honest feedback would be given in a kind and balanced way. It sounded good in principle, but the reality was that I rarely heard any negative feedback on anyone's work, and received none at all on my own. Marvellous! you might think. My book must be perfect! Except, of course, it wasn't. No one's is. And this lack of constructive criticism meant that an evening at my writing group was simply a rather jolly social evening. Nice if that's what you're after, but it wasn't for me. 
My current group is focused and specific. The other writers are both published, both understanding the relationships of agents, editors and authors. We are all working on different projects, and at different stages, but we all have a good handle on each other's work. If I'm struggling with how to layer in some tension, or working on resolving a plot hole, the others know enough about what I'm writing to be able to offer constructive suggestions. Feedback on anything I share is honest and supportive, but also brutally honest. What's the point in any other kind of feedback? 
No one can exist in a vacuum, and although I think it's dangerous to share work-in-progress with too many people - especially if you're already getting clear editorial input from a literary agent or editor - ongoing feedback is hugely beneficial and encouraging. I regularly email chapters or plot ideas to my best friend, as well as bouncing them around at my writing group, and this peer support keeps me buoyant and acts as a barometer for what might work for 'real' readers. 
I wrote I Let You Go without the support of a writing group, but with regular feedback from a friend who was also writing a crime novel. We exchanged passages, competed on word count (she always won), and provided shoulders to cry on when things weren't working out. By the time I was at the editing stage I had joined my small but perfectly formed writing group, who cheered me on from the sidelines as I wrote book two, and are now helping me thrash out the plot for book three. 

Writing is solitary, but writers don't have to be. 

Monday, 4 May 2015

Nicky Wells - 7 Years Bad Sex

STOP PRESS.STOP PRESS.STOP PRESS.STOP PRESS
PRE-ORDER ANNOUNCEMENT
7 YEARS BAD SEX
AVAILABLE TO ORDER NOW!

PRE - ORDER a copy here: Amazon UK  |  US  |  DE  |  CA 

About the book...
One wedding. One curse?  Disaster ever after…

A seven-years-bad-sex curse? Surely not! Yet something went wrong when rock singer Casey and drummer Alex got married on that beautiful yacht anchored off St Tropez in the south of France. Something went badly wrong. For even on their wedding night, the young couple discovers a complete and somewhat surprising inability to make love. Muddling through their honeymoon with a string of thin excuses for their predicament, the lovers defer finding a solution (and panicking) until the return to their home in London. After all, they married for life and to make rock music, not for the love of sex. Right?

But when they resume life as normal in London, all hell breaks loose. Increasingly frantic in their quest for release, the unhappy newlyweds embark on a string of hilarious and occasionally harmful antics that drives them, their band, and an assortment of random strangers to the brink of despair. But it ain’t over ‘til it’s over or, in this case… it ain’t over ‘til the newlyweds sing.


Excerpt...
FROM 7 YEARS BAD SEX BY NICKY WELLS
RELEASES 14 MAY 2015!

There was a stunned silence in the room while Alex and Casey tried to assimilate the importance of this statement. She remembered all too well her conversation with Alex on the yacht after they had trawled through the wedding video. He had pointed out to her even then that she hadn’t looked at him. 
Casey shivered. She caught Alex’s eye and saw nothing but utter confusion. Liza was still standing up, one fist raised in an air punch. Sasha had taken one of Casey’s hands into her own.
Eventually Alex spoke. ‘Maybe we didn’t look at each other. So what?’
Liza and Sasha shared another look. ‘The seven-years-bad-sex curse!’ they shouted as one.
Alex burst out laughing. ‘The seven-years-bad-sex curse?’ he repeated. ‘You’re taking the mickey, right?’
Myles was chuckling so hard, he toppled over sideways on the sofa and had to hold his stomach. ‘That’s why we had to rush over here? To tell them about a seven-years-bad-sex curse?’
‘Laugh all you want,’ Liza said calmly. ‘But you’re watching it in action.’
Casey swallowed hard. She didn’t believe in curses. They were nothing but delusory superstitions from the middle ages. But still, both Sasha and Liza looked utterly serious.
‘So—so what does that curse entail?’ Casey asked, her voice almost a whisper.
Sasha produced her smartphone and called up a website. ‘It says here,’ she said, ‘there’s a superstition in many parts of southern Europe about how not looking at each other when clinking glasses during a toast brings couples seven years bad sex.’ She angled her phone so that everyone could see the screen.
‘And you were in France when you committed this ritualistic mishap,’ Liza offered helpfully. ‘So that definitely applies.’

Fallen for Rock | Fairy Tale in New York | 7 Years Bad Sex: Amazon UK  |  US  |  DE  |  CA 

About the author...
Romance that Rocks Your World!

Ultimate rock chick author Nicky Wells writes romance with rock stars—because there’s no better romantic hero than a golden-voiced bad boy with a secret soft heart and a magical stage presence!

Nicky’s books offer glitzy, glamorous romance with rock stars—imagine Bridget Jones ROCKS Notting Hill! If you’ve ever had a crush on any kind of celebrity, you’ll connect with Nicky’s heroes and their leading ladies.

Born in Germany, Nicky moved to the United Kingdom in 1993 and currently lives in Lincoln with her husband and their two boys. Nicky loves listening to rock music, dancing, and eating lobsters. When she’s not writing, she’s a wife, mother, occasional knitter, and ad-hoc radio show presenter. Rock on!



Did you know? There’s a single out now by Nicky’s fictional rock band Tuscq come to life! “Love Me Better” is available for download from AmazoniTunes and many other places. 

Goodreads Giveaway...
Nicky will be giving away two (2) signed paperback copies of 7 Years Bad Sex over on Goodreads in advance of the official launch day of 7 Years Bad Sex on 14 May. Don’t miss your chance to enter!
Giveaway is open to readers in the US, UK, and Canada, and runs from 23 April 2015 to 10 May 2015—hurry, hurry!